Kratom-World / Kratom Health

Kratom Warnings, Kratom Heath Risks & Kratom Addiction

Is Kratom bad for you; bad for your health ? Are Cream Cakes bad for you? Is alcohol bad for you? The answer is yes if you over indulge in anything its bad for you. One must remember that a little of what we enjoy in life is actually good for you ! - I guess were trying to say that moderation is the key to happiness and health.

Kratom Health risks

Studies have shown a very small number of health related problems, primarily in Thailand. Rare reports of addiction document users experiencing darker pigmentation of the face, weight loss, and have physical withdrawal symptoms if they quit abruptly. Withdrawal symptoms include runny nose, muscle aches, diarrhea, crying, irritability and muscle jerking.

Kratom Addiction

Kratom can be habit forming (addictive) from heavy regular use. Just like many drugs, tobacco, painkillers, coffee, alcohol the addiction can become hard to kick if used everyday. The occasional kratom user is very unlikely to become dependent and health risks are rare. At worst some users experience constipation, minor stomach cramps or increased urination.

Apart from addiction, side effects from long term use can include weight loss, insomnia, and a darkening of the skin (mainly the cheeks), giving an hepatic face appearance. Among addicts, 30% report limited sexual desire and the need to use a combination of kratom and alcohol to become sexually stimulated. One study found 5 people who had psychotic conditions which may or may not have been revealed by very heavy kratom use. As discussed earlier, addiction seems to be a possibility if high doses are used.

Kratom Warnings

Combining drugs is usually a bad idea. It is recommended that you do not combine kratom with yohimbine, cocaine, amphetamine-like drugs, or large doses of caffeine, because of the possibility of over-stimulation or increased blood pressure. We recommend that kratom not be combined with large amounts of alcohol, with benzodiazepines, opiates, or any other drugs that depress the nervous system. This is because of the possibility that such combinations might cause over-sedation or even possible respiratory depression (not breathing),

It is also recommended that you do not use kratom in combination with MAO inhibitors, such as Syrian Rue (Peganum harmala), Banisteriopsis caapi, Passionflower (Passiflora incarnata) and certain anti-depressants. Serious, even fatal, reactions can occur if MAO inhibitor drugs are combined with monoamine drugs. The combination of MAO inhibitor drugs with kratom, which contains monoamine alkaloids, has not been studied.

Other Kratom risks

Do not use if pregnant or lactating; do not combine with other drugs or alcohol. Do not use when driving or operating machinery. Basically, please be sensible with kratom effects.

Kratom Cures Addiction

A very important factor regarding Kratom is that it can actually cure addiction.

Inspired by traditional use, H. Ridley reported In 1897 that the leaves of Mitragyna speciosa were a cure for opium addiction. In more recent times, mitragynine has been used in New Zealand for methadone addiction detox. Kratom was smoked whenever the patient experienced withdrawal symptoms, over a 6 week treatment period. Patients reported a visualization effect taking place at night in the form of vivid hypnagogic dreams. While working on plans for ibogaine experiments in the USA, Cures Not Wars activist Dana Beal suggested that mitragynine could be used as an active placebo for comparison in the study. Acting Deputy Director of the NIDA Charles Grudzinskas rejected the proposal, however, saying that even less was known about mitragynine than ibogaine.

Although chemically similar, ibogaine and mitragynine work by different pathways, and have different applications in treatment of narcotic addiction. While ibogaine is intended as a one time treatment to cure addiction, mitragynine used to gradual wean the user off narcotics. The fact that mitragynine's mu crossover is increased by the presence of opiate drugs may be exploitable in the treatment of narcotics addiction, because it directs binding to where it is needed, automatically regulating the attachment ratio and modulating it towards the delta receptors over a short time. Within a few days, the addict would stop use of the narcotic they are addicted to, and the cravings and withdrawal will be moderated by the binding of mitragynine to the delta receptors. Mitragynine could also perhaps be used as a maintenance drug for addicts not wishing to quit but trying to moderate an out of hand addiction.

In 1999, Pennapa Sapcharoen, director of the National Institute of Thai Traditional Medicine in Bangkok said that kratom could be prescribed both to opiate addicts and to patients suffering from depression, but stressed that further research is needed. Chulalongkorn University chemists have isolated mitragynine which researchers can obtain for study.